Is Negligence Increasing Concussions Among Girls Playing Soccer?

Posted on July 14, 2018 by Selingo Guagliardo
Photo of an MRI Film that Show Damage from a Traumatic Brain Injury

For a few years, more and more scientific studies about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) have flooded the media. This degenerative brain disease is commonly found in veterans and athletes—most notably football players. As a result, many parents have banned their young boys from playing football. Now, some are beginning to see that this disease could be just as dangerous to girls. And they want officials in charge to make up for the negligence of not protecting these female athletes.

Is Failing to Prevent Concussions Negligence?

U.S. Soccer Federation governs a nationwide sports league with 1.7 million girls registered to play. This organization has many rules and requirements to ensure safe playing, but some Pennsylvania parents don’t think those rules go far enough.

In recent studies, researchers have found that modern Kevlar headgear can help protect players from concussions. Yet, U.S. Soccer has not implemented headgear requirements into its youth league rules. This has resulted in a lawsuit filed by the parents of two teenage girls who suffered concussions while playing soccer with the group.

The lawsuit claims negligence on the part of U.S. Soccer and its member, the U.S. Youth Soccer Association. The suit claims that in spite of evidence showing that headgear works, the organizations have failed to implement the safety measures. This is further compounded by the fact that the league does mandate other safety devices such as shin guards and other equipment.

This is just one case in a rising trend of parents holding schools and sports leagues responsible for concussion injuries. Though most of these cases have been focused on predominantly male sports, experts are realizing female-oriented sports can be just as dangerous. Some believe that head injuries in soccer and cheerleading may even exceed how many occur in boy’s football.

If you suspect your child’s safety is being disregarded by the coaches or rule makers in the sports they play, contact an attorney. An attorney may help spur change with your local sports organizations and help protect your child. For more info about using a lawsuit to affect real change, keep following the blog at Selingo Guagliardo.